Publishing Changing "In An Instant" - Google and Twitter Team Up to Offer Their Own Instant Articles

Sep 17, 2015 Lisa Mokaba
It seems as though no landscape (with the exception of perhaps the Tien Shan glaciers which are melting at an alarming rate) is changing faster than the media. The latest shift, being pushed out across some of the biggest platforms, is "instant articles."
Facebook took the first leap back in May, introducing "Instant Articles" as a new way for publishers to push out content quickly and help eliminate the load time (a brutal eight seconds, how impatient are we?) when sharing articles with friends. The move was criticized by some as a way to keep content, and subsequently power, within Facebook's site and grasp. However, the opportunity to reach a growing number of interested, albeit impatient, readers was enough for publications such as The New York Times and The Atlantic to get on board.

Now Google and Twitter are getting in on the instant game, announcing that they too will be allowing publishers to show "instant articles" to readers who are using their services while on mobile devices. One of the key differences here, however, is that neither Google nor Twitter will be hosting the articles. Unlike Facebook's approach, the "instant article" that pops up is a "snapshot" of the article hosted on the original publisher's site. This is of particular importance to those publishers who were not crazy about Facebook being the host to their content, but still want to reach us eager readers who, apparently, possess the attention span of a fruit fly.

But are instant articles the be all and end all of news publishing right now? Nope. Another major media move to watch is by tech's most glorious fruit, Apple, (a title easily usurped from beans) as they roll out the Apple News App this week. This new app, available with iOS 9, will allow users to read, share and save articles, as well as curate their feeds to include only the news outlets they value.

So what does it all mean? Expect more content, quicker. Speed has long been a key factor in the news industry, and that desire to be the first to publish is certainly extending to how quickly we want to share and consume news. I, for one, welcome our new instant article overlords, even though the eight second delay never really bothered me. Patience is a virtue and I lived through dial-up modems, emerging on the other side a more patient person because of it.

Topics: InkHouse, Twitter, Google, Journalism

To subscribe to the InkHouse Inklings blog, and for other thought leadership content just add your email address:

AUTHORS

ARCHIVES

TOPICS

InkHouse has been recognized by: