Eleven Associated Press Style Tips for the 2014 FIFA World Cup

Jun 19, 2014 admin

With São Paolo, Brazil, in the world spotlight, writers will be kicking around edits to achieve top content.

The Associated Press has published its topical guide for the 2014 FIFA World Cup, compiling essential terms, spelling and usage for the month-long competition. Concluding Sunday, July 13, the international men’s football tournament features 32 teams – all seeking the gold FIFA World Cup Trophy – across 12 venues in 12 cities.

While watching Portugal’s Cristiano Ronaldo complain on field or USA’s John Brooks net game-winning goals, writers can incorporate AP’s World Cup guidelines:

  • 4-2-3-1 formation: The typical line-up of a modern-day soccer team, with four defenders, two deep midfielders, three attacking midfielders and one forward.
  • backpass: A pass that a player makes back toward his own goal, to the goalkeeper on his team. The goalkeeper is unable to pick up the ball if the pass comes from the player’s foot.
  • football: Preferred term for soccer internationally.
  • hand ball: A foul awarded when a player deliberately touches the ball with his hand or any part of his arm.
  • hospital pass: A pass to a player who will be heavily tackled by an opponent upon receiving it.
  • parking the bus: A phrase used by coaches in the English Premier League – and some elsewhere – to describe how a team packs its defense to protect a lead of a draw. It can often involve using all 10 outfield players as defenders.
  • red card: Issued to a player who commits a serious foul or who has been issued two yellow cards in the same game. The player must leave the field and cannot be replaced.
  • throw-in: When a player restarts play by throwing the ball back onto the pitch from its perimeter. The player must keep both feet on the ground and have both hands behind his head as he throws the ball.
  • wall: A line of defensive players protecting the team’s goalkeeper at a free kick.
  • World Cup: Not World Cup Finals.
  • zonal marking: A system of defending at corners where players from the defensive team mark areas rather than opposition players; an alternative to man-to-man marking.

To score goals in mastering written style, learn when it’s appropriate to use more than or over and study hard-to-remember rules.

Topics: Content, Public Relations, Writing, Journalism

To subscribe to the InkHouse Inklings blog, and for other thought leadership content just add your email address:

ARCHIVES

TOPICS

InkHouse has been recognized by:
  • TPTW_2019_grey
  • BPTW_SF
  • inc-bwp-2019-standard-logo
  • women-led-business-logo-1
  • PRNews_TopPlaces